Local Impact

Exploration companies, state and federal agencies and communities now recognize the vital role that an informed public plays in the successful development of any project. Alaska Earth Sciences is sensitive to the social and economic impacts of development on rural villages. Our projects are closely connected to the surrounding communities, offering direct employment and contracts with local businesses whenever possible. We always strive to acknowledge our impact and involve stakeholders throughout our presence in an area.

Alaska Earth Sciences has the experience and personnel necessary to cultivate informed and engaged stakeholders that will one day be your employees, contractors, vendors and partners.

Your project will profit from our wide range of stakeholder relations/community engagement services that aide in permitting and operations while ensuring that surrounding communities optimize the benefits of your development.

Liaison to Native Corporations

Alaska offers the unique opportunity to work with Native corporations and their local shareholders. Some of our most gratifying relationships have come from working with the people who live and work in rural Alaska.

During the early exploration years at Donlin Creek, AES President Rob Retherford played an important role in pursuing a shareholder-hiring program to ensure local residents had a chance to learn about and be employed by the mining industry. AES Vice-President Bill Ellis has pursued an aggressive local hire program over many years of work in the CIRI and Aleut regions.

AES has worked with Alaskan Native Corporations throughout the state. Our experience in rural Alaska equips us with a deep understanding of the social and cultural issues that can impact exploration and development both favorably and unfavorably.

Alaska Earth Sciences is a conscientious neighbor dedicated to responsible resource development.

 

“Alaska is at a critical juncture. Several major mines are now in production and the State is realizing more mining jobs and revenues than ever before. We can – and must – demonstrate that exploration and mining of coal and minerals is good for rural villages, the state’s economy, and compatible with a clean and healthy environment.” Rob Retherford, President